I Really Need... a Curtain for Julien

A personal curtain for Julien, based on her visual preferences and the process of getting to know each other. The work was not just the object but the whole process of building up a relationship with her, creating value by having meaningful conversations, exchanging knowledge, and skills. Julien is an advisor for self organisation. She is stimulating cooperations towards the transition to sustainability, community, and a circular economy. As exchange for the curtain we had a lot of conversations about how one can create an initiative which generates payed jobs in their field of interest, how an artist or any other freelancer can make their living, and how different economies could work.

 

The I REALLY NEED... project

In collaboration with Anastasia Starostenko

Who are we to make things? Which effect do we aim to achieve with the things we make? What can we make in a world of plenty, what can we make which is really needed, which is not just a waste of resources? How to define the (exchange) value of what we make? With the overproduction in the world today we are surrounded by an enormous amount of impersonal objects, that carry no or very little personal value for their owners. This value is certainly always connected to a need. We only wanted to make something if someone asked for it, if someone needed it. These thoughts led us to the question: What do we actually really need? This is a highly philosophical question. It is touching the core of our existence and one of the most personal questions one could ask. By asking this question to people, which sounds superficial at first glance, we ended up having quite deep conversations which led us into personal relations with the people. We made some unique objects for people we got to know better based on their personal taste and interest. Instead of asking a certain price for our work we asked people to think of a reward themselves, for example something they were good at or something they thought would be valuable to us.

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